Category Archives: African-American History

Black History Month – Remembering Bayard Rustin – New play based on biography – Lost Prophet

© Frank H. Jump

Bayard Rustin's life is depicted in a new play and a biography by John D'Emilio. - Amazon dot com

Check out the details of the new play at Jeff Kelly Lowenstein’s blog.

Wondering if Harold Ford of Tennessee will be in attendance?

CLICK HERE FOR OTHER BAYARD RUSTIN POSTINGS

Advertisements

– – – Adam Clayton Powell was a homophobe! – – – Marlon Riggs: Black Is, Black Ain’t – Deconstruction to Reconstruction: Marlon Riggs & Blackness

Remembering Bayard Rustin on MLK Day - © Frank H. Jump

Previously posted on Fading Ad Campaign website.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Adam Clayton Powell threatened to spread a rumor that Bayard Rustin & Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr were having an affair unless King fired Rustin from his integral leadership position in the Civil Rights Movement. Bayard went on to organize the August 28, 1963 March on Washington at A. Phillip Randolph’s insistence.

LINKS:

Tribute to Haitian Soldiers – Les Chasseurs Volontaires de Saint Domingue – 1779 – Revolutionary War Savannah, GA

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Haitian Disaster Relief Links:

Bayard Rustin: Gay Man in the Civil Rights Movement.

The man behind the man: Bayard Rustin & the pivotal role he played in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s success.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Bayard Rustin: Gay man in the Civil R…“, posted with vodpod

The City Concealed: Weeksville on Vimeo

Thirteen dot org

The Hunterfly Road Houses of Weeksville are the discovered remains of a free African-American community from the 1800s.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “The City Concealed: Weeksville on Vimeo“, posted with vodpod

From WE SHALL OVERCOME To YES WE CAN!: Our First African-American President – A Blog-Quest Curriculum for Fifth Grade – Robert Ross, Teaching Artist & Frank H. Jump, Cert. Instructional Technology Specialist

(Left) Scene in Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. Note building with sign reading Auction & Negro Sales, a slave trade business. Slave auction ad (middle) On right: Scars of a whipped slave (April 2, 1863, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. Original caption: Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture. - Wikipedia

(Left) Scene in Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. Note building with sign reading "Auction & Negro Sales", a slave trade business. Slave auction ad (middle) On right: Scars of a whipped slave (April 2, 1863, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. Original caption: Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture. - Wikipedia

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

I. Slavery in the New World: Which Side Are You On?
II. Abolitionists & The Underground Railroad
III. The Civil War: A Moral Dilemma Tears Apart The Nation
IV. Reconstruction: From Bondage to the Ballot Box to Public Office
V. The Jim Crow Era
VI. We Shall Overcome: Brown v. The Board of Education
VII. I Have A Dream: The Civil Rights Struggle of the 1950s & 1960s
VIII. African Americans in High Places in the USA
IX. Yes We Can: Barack Obama Becomes Our First African-American President
X. Recording Session

CLICK HERE FOR FULL PROJECT NARRATIVE

Project created and written by Robert “Bluesman” Ross
This project is made possible with funds from the Local Capacity Building Initiative, a regrant program of the Arts in Education Program of the New York State Council on the Arts, administered by BRIC Arts / Media / Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

Project designed for blog by lead teacher, Frank H. Jump.

Robert Ross has worked with our school through BRIC’s Rotunda Gallery. This grant was written by Ross for our school, PS 119, where I teach technology. I took Ross’s curriculum, in which the task for students is to write four lines of rhyme or rap for each section, and created a blog-quest with links to the songs and lyrics, in addition to providing powerful images culled from the Internet with additional links and resources. Feel free to use this in your classrooms. Please leave comments.

Negro Sales & Marriages

Library of Congress by way of Wikipedia

Library of Congress by way of Wikipedia

There was a time in our history when African-American marriages under slavery were not recognized. After their emancipation, this caused much legal wrangling.

There was a time in our history when African-American marriages under slavery were not recognized. After their emancipation, this caused much legal wrangling.

Before the Civil War, slave marriages had no legal standing. During the war, blacks serving in the Union Army married under military authority. Henry M. Turner, one of the first black chaplains to serve in the Union Army, officiated at the wedding of Rufus Wright and Elisabeth Turner.

Learn more about this certificate

On June 21, 1864, six months after his marriage, Wright died of abdominal wounds received in action at Petersburg. His widow’s legal status enabled her to receive pension benefits from the federal government.
America’s Reconstruction: People & Politics After the Civil War – Digital History

Imagine that!

Harry T. Burleigh (1866-1949) – Composer

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Harry T. Burleigh (1866-1949)“, posted with vodpod
GO DOWN MOSES!

Harry T. Burleigh (1866 – 1949), a great singer and expert on spirituals is associated with this song but it was written before he was born. The author is unknown. The Golden Gate Quartet, Paul Robeson, and Louis Armstrong all recorded wonderful versions of it. The story is about the exodus of the Hebrews (people of Israel) from Egypt after 300 years of slavery.

Harry T. Burleigh – Wikipedia

Wait One Cotton-Picking-Minute!

Picture History

Picture History

Thursday Cotton Picking Day at Lillie Burney Elementary (Hattiesburg, MS) – where children were invited to dress as slaves for a plantation reenactment – was cancelled. – Ausetkmt’s POD313 DailyNews Blog

February is Black History Month – Don’t Forget Our LGBTQ African-Americans

2007 US Commemorative Stamps Honoring Lesbian & Gay African-Americans © Frank H. Jump

2007 US Commemorative Stamps Honoring Lesbian & Gay African-Americans © Frank H. Jump

Audre Lorde – Audrey Geraldine Lorde was born on February 18, 1934 in New York City. She decided to drop the “y” from the end of her name at a young age, setting a precedent in her life of self determination. She was the daughter of Caribbean immigrants who settled in Harlem. She graduated from Columbia University and Hunter College, where she later held the prestigious post of Thomas Hunter Chair of Literature. She was married for eight years in the 1960’s, and had two children — Elizabeth and Jonathan. Lorde was a self described “Black lesbian, mother, warrior, poet”. However, her life was one that could not be summed up in a phrase.¹

James Baldwin – James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, writer, playwright, poet, essayist, and civil rights activist. Most of Baldwin’s work deals with racial and sexual issues in the mid-20th century United States. His novels are notable for the personal way in which they explore questions of identity as well as for the way in which they mine complex social and psychological pressures related to being black and homosexual well before the social, cultural or political equality of these groups could be assumed.²

Bayard Rustin – (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was an American civil rights activist, important largely behind the scenes in the civil rights movement of the 1960s and earlier, and principal organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He counseled Martin Luther King, Jr. on the techniques of nonviolent resistance. Rustin was openly gay and advocated on behalf of gay and lesbian causes in the latter part of his career. A year before his death in 1987, Rustin said: “The barometer of where one is on human rights questions is no longer the black community, it’s the gay community. Because it is the community which is most easily mistreated.”³

Barbara Jordan – Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician from Texas. She served as a congresswoman in the United States House of Representatives from 1973 to 1979. Jordan was a lesbian with a longtime companion of more than 20 years, Nancy Earl; Jordan never publicly acknowledged her sexual orientation, but in her obituary, the Houston Chronicle mentioned her longtime relationship with Earl. After Jordan’s initial unsuccessful statewide races, advisers warned her to become more discreet and not bring any female companions on the campaign trail.

Previously posted on February 1, 2008

GLBTQ Encyclopedia Looks at the Harlem Renaissance Through a Lavender Lens

LGBT Harlem Renaissance Writers
Eight important glbtq contributors to the Harlem Renaissance:
Row 1: (left to right) Countee Cullen and Alice Dunbar-Nelson
Row 2: Angelina Weld Grimké and Langston Hughes
Row 3: Alain Locke and Claude McKay
Row 4: Wallace Thurman and Carl Van Vechten

Images of Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, and Carl Van Vechten are details from photographs created by Carl Van Vechten and appear courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Hughes, Langston (1902-1967)

Langston Hughes - gay poet

“Langston Hughes, whose literary legacy is enormous and varied, was closeted, but homosexuality was an important influence on his literary imagination, and many of his poems may be read as gay texts… One of the greatest ironies in the life of the people’s poet was his own understandable silence regarding the oppression of gays. As a gay man, Hughes lived that secret life silently in the confines of a very narrow, but well-constructed closet–one that still shelters him today.” ¹Alden Reimonenq

Alden Reimonenq is Interim Dean of the College of Humanities at California State University, Northridge. He taught at St. Mary’s College of California for seventeen years. He is working on a biographical and critical study of Countee Cullen. His poetry and reviews have appeared in James White Review and in the anthology Milking Black Bull: 12 Black Gay Poets. His book of poetry Hoodoo Headrag was published in 2001.

Check out Frank H. Jump’s
Harlem Renaissance DVD Webquest!

Jacob Lawrence

Strange Fruit: Comparing the Oppression of African-Americans and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered Communities

Comparing the Oppression of African-Americans and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered Communities
by Miss Poppy Dixon

Lesbian & Gay African-Americans – Tribute to Black History Month – U.S. Commemorative Stamps – Frank H. Jump

Lesbian & Gay African-American US Commemorative Stamps - Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump

Audre Lorde – Audrey Geraldine Lorde was born on February 18, 1934 in New York City. She decided to drop the “y” from the end of her name at a young age, setting a precedent in her life of self determination. She was the daughter of Caribbean immigrants who settled in Harlem. She graduated from Columbia University and Hunter College, where she later held the prestigious post of Thomas Hunter Chair of Literature. She was married for eight years in the 1960’s, and had two children — Elizabeth and Jonathan. Lorde was a self described “Black lesbian, mother, warrior, poet”. However, her life was one that could not be summed up in a phrase.¹

James Baldwin – James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, writer, playwright, poet, essayist, and civil rights activist. Most of Baldwin’s work deals with racial and sexual issues in the mid-20th century United States. His novels are notable for the personal way in which they explore questions of identity as well as for the way in which they mine complex social and psychological pressures related to being black and homosexual well before the social, cultural or political equality of these groups could be assumed.²

Bayard Rustin – (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was an American civil rights activist, important largely behind the scenes in the civil rights movement of the 1960s and earlier, and principal organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He counseled Martin Luther King, Jr. on the techniques of nonviolent resistance. Rustin was openly gay and advocated on behalf of gay and lesbian causes in the latter part of his career. A year before his death in 1987, Rustin said: “The barometer of where one is on human rights questions is no longer the black community, it’s the gay community. Because it is the community which is most easily mistreated.”³

Barbara Jordan – Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician from Texas. She served as a congresswoman in the United States House of Representatives from 1973 to 1979. Jordan was a lesbian with a longtime companion of more than 20 years, Nancy Earl; Jordan never publicly acknowledged her sexual orientation, but in her obituary, the Houston Chronicle mentioned her longtime relationship with Earl. After Jordan’s initial unsuccessful statewide races, advisers warned her to become more discreet and not bring any female companions on the campaign trail.