Category Archives: Flour & Bread

My First Loaf – Seeded Spelt Bread

My First Loaf © Frank H. Jump

My First Loaf © Frank H. Jump

Leavening the dough / Working it with your fingers / An age-old tradition  #haiku

Leavening the dough / Working it with your fingers / An age-o... on Twitpic

My buddy Bob in Palm Springs got this great recipe for a knead-less bread. I used spelt flour and later read that spelt is a fragile grain and doesn’t produce a good gluten, so I made a second batch of dough with unbleached organic wheat flour and combined them both in the kneading process. I used caraway seeds and an “everything bagel” topping. Mmm mmm mmm.

Ingredients:

3 Cups of stone ground unbleached white flour

1/4 teaspoon of yeast

A little less than tablespoon of Salt

1 & 2/3 cup of tepid water

cornmeal

Equipement

Cast Iron or ceramic casserole pot with lid (ours is 5 inches tall by 10 inches wide)

Method:

Step 1: Mix all dry ingredients in a metal or ceramic bowl. Pour in water and mix until everything is blended. Cover the bowl with Saran Wrap and cover with a clean dish towel. Place the bowl in a place where it can sit at room temperature undisturbed for 12 hours.
(You can leave it longer if need be, it really does not matter, I have left it for 24 hours without a problem. )

Step 2: After that period of time, flour a working surface so the bread will not stick and pour the dough, which may be quite wet on to the surface. Fluff enough flour around the bread so that you can handle it. Let the dough rest for 15 minutes. Then into a clean tea towel pour about 1 1/2 tablespoons of medium or fine cornmeal. Place the bread on the tea towel, spread one more half tablespoon of cornmeal on top of the bread and fold the tea towel over the bread. Let it rest for two hours. You can also add any seeds you wish at this point, poppy, sesame etc.

Step 3 :Preheat the oven and the casserole pot to 450 degrees for a half an hour.

Step 4

After the bread has rested for a total of 2 hours and the oven and pot have been preheating for half an hour, pour the bread* from the tea towel into the hot pot. This will seem fairly slipshod but don’t worry, just dump it in the pot. Cover the pot and bake at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 10 minutes. Place on baking rack to cool. Admire your bread…it will look like you had an art director and a food stylist working on this while it was in the oven…no boule!

*Prior to this step you may garnish the dough with fresh herbs or sea salt or multi-grains – whatever.

Enjoy your crispy fresh bread – start the next batch the moment you take this one out of the oven! With the 12 hour turn around time you will need it.

If you are concerned about bread consumption, SLICE IT THIN! It makes wonderful little crisps. If you subtract the time you allow the bread to rise, the actual time of assembly is less than 5 minutes and the cost is about 30 cents a loaf.

This is a recipe from the Sullivan Street Bakery on 47th Street in New York City. Enjoy… try it with a some great olives a glass of earthy red wine, some virgin olive oil and sea salt and maybe a slice of great cheese….ah happiness!

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Home of Palagonia – World’s Finest Italian Bread – Brooklyn, NY

Junius Street - Brownsville, Brooklyn - © Frank H. Jump

Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods, dating back to the Neolithic era. The development of leavened bread can probably also be traced to prehistoric times. – Wikipedia

At one time, Palagonia was the ONLY Italian bread you could buy at a corner deli. I wouldn’t call it the best anymore. Vincenzo is a fan (see Enzo’s View) of Cityline’s Rosa Maria Bakery & Deli on 101st Avenue – if you want a really good semolina bread. Another favorite of ours is Paneantico Bakery off 65th Street & 14th Avenue in Bensonhurst.

101st Avenue - Cityline - Brooklyn/Queens - © Vincenzo Aiosa

Hotel Fenimore – Holsum Bread – Tom Keene Cigars – Seattle, WA

Broadway and Jefferson © Frank H. Jump

Broadway and Jefferson © Frank H. Jump

Also seen at Ghost Signs of the Last Outpost – Seattle Ghost Signs:

Grocery & General Stores – Dry Goods & Feed – Coffee & More – Tularosa, NM

Dry Goods - Ready To Wear - Groceries & Feed - runs horizontally on sign below © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Groceries, Flour & Feed © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Frank H. Jump

Rex Flour – Rex is King – Spokane, WA

© Frank H. Jump

Smoking Tobacco Pentimento © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

A gorgeous shot on Flickr!

Rex Flour – Rex is King – Butte, MT

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Helms Olympic Bread Building – Culver City, CA

© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump
© Frank H. Jump

Helms Bakery – Wikipedia

Stanislaus Flour – Coulterville Train & Road Museum – West of Yosemite, CA

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Road Grader - Used by Mariposa Co. Road Department -- Donor- Blaine Sturtevant © Frank H. Jump

Coulterville, CA – formerly Maxwell’s Creek – Wikipedia

Farmers Alliance – El Paso de Robles, CA

© Frank H. Jump

San Luis Obispo County © Frank H. Jump

Farmers’ Alliance – El Paso de Robles – Wikipedia

E. Doubler Flour & Feed – Fairchild’s Flour – Cleveland, OH

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

A Walk Around The Block in Downtown Middletown, NY

Snyder & Fancher Wholesale Grocers

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© NY Times

© NY Times

Simmons Spice Mill - Google Books

Simmon's Spice Mill - Google Books

Google Books

Google Books

Google Books

Google Books

Duluth Imperial Flour

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

E-bay

barewalls.com

E-bay

E-bay

North Tarrytown, NY - Fading Ad Campaign © Frank H. Jump

North Tarrytown, NY - Fading Ad Campaign © Frank H. Jump

Altec

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

A Short Corporate History Behind the Altec Name:

The Altec and Altec Lansing names have been with us since the mid 1930s.

pre-1924: Western Electric established an engineering group in Chicago, IL to research amplifiers and loudspeakers.

1924: This engineering group was moved to Bell Laboratories in Manhattan, NY.
1928: Western Electric formed Electric Research Products, Inc. (ERPI) to manufacture, install, and service talking picture systems in studios and theatres.
c1936: Western Electric is ordered to divest itself of ERPI. ERPI management founds the Altec (All Technical Services) Service Company. The University Loudspeaker Company is founded in New York to manufacturer loudspeakers and components.
1941: Altec Service Company acquires the Lansing Manufacturing Company and changes its name to Altec Lansing Corporation.
1947: Altec Lansing Corporation acquires Peerless Electrical Products Company.
1949: Altec Lansing Corporation acquires Western Electric Sound Products Division and begins producing Western Electric product lines.
1954: Altec Lansing Corporation founds Newpaths, Inc. to build theatre stereo equipment.
1956: First public trading of Altec’s stock.(? Altec Companies, Inc.)
1959: Ling Electronics, Inc. merges with Altec Companies, Inc. The new company is named Ling-Altec Electronics, Inc. University Sound Products acquired by LTV.
1960: Ling-Altec Electronics, Inc. merges with Dallas, TX based Temco Electronics and Missile Co. to become Ling-Temco Electronics, Inc.
Aug. 1961: Ling-Temco Electronics, Inc. merges with Chance Vought Aircraft of Dallas, TX (the nation’s second oldest continuous producer of military aircraft, founded in 1917) and the name is changed to Ling-Temco-Vought Inc.
1964: While maintaining a majority interest, James Ling started a holding company that established three public companies from his existing operations; LTV Aerospace Corp., LTV Ling Altec, Inc. and LTV Electrosystems (later E-Systems).
1971: Ling-Temco-Vought Inc. spins-off LTV Ling Altec, Inc. The new public company is called the Altec Corporation.
Apr. 1972: Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc., the holding company, becomes the LTV Corporation.
1984: Altec Corporation moves all operations to Oklahoma City, OK
while trying to emerge from bankruptcy.
1985: Gulton Industries purchases the assets of Altec Corporation, and renames the company Altec Lansing Corporation.
1986: Gulton Industries is acquired by Mark IV Industries of Buffalo, NY.
1986: Altec Lansing Consumer Products is established in Milford, PA to design, engineer and introduce a new line of home and car high fidelity loudspeakers.
1997: Mark IV Industries announces its intention to sell the Audio Group, including Altec Lansing Corporation.
1998: Greenwich Street Capital Partners of New York City purchases the Mark IV Audio Group, and renames the collected companies the EVI Audio Group. Altec Lansing Corporation becomes a nonentity.
1999: Telex Communications (another Greenwich holding) is merged with the EVI Audio Group.
2000: Altec Lansing Technologies, Inc. of Milford, PA purchases from Telex Communications the worldwide rights to the Altec Lansing brand names and associated trademarks; Altec, Altec Lansing, Lansing, Voice of the Theatre, Voice of the Highway and Duplex.
2002: Altec Lansing Technologies, Inc. launches professional division; Altec Lansing Professional.

Altec Lansing Audio History

Obelisk Flour – Richmond, VA

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Sunday’s Feature Fades – Bob Kisken Out Midwest

Cheyenne, WY

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Casper, WY

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Bruce’s Crossing, MI

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Denver, CO

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Huron, SD

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Lacrosse, WI

© Bob Kisken

© Bob Kisken

Curbside Matzoh – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Curbside Matzoh
© Frank H. Jump

Matza, Matzah, Matzo and Matzoh

My favorite is the Onion and Egg with some buttah. Never did care for schmaltz.  Happy Pesach!

Gold Medal Flour (Behind WAH Center) – Williamsburg, Brooklyn 2000

Gold Medal Flour - Williamsburg, Brookyn
© Frank H. Jump

“Eventually…”