Category Archives: Fading Ad Campaign

As Fading Ad Blog Approaches One Million Visits…

Reckitt's Blue - March, 1998 © Frank H. Jump

I’ve been working on transferring FAB to my own domain (fadingad.com/fadingadblog). Not broke, why fix it you ask? Well, it is time to make the switch as we approach our millionth viewer. This summer, I am also planning to begin the process of self-publishing the Fading Ad Campaign – a collection of the original images that launched this project in 1997. Shortly after the exhibition in 1998 at the N-Y Historical Society, I launched the websites at frankjump.com and fadingad.com and now feel the need to document this in print. Hopefully, this will be the first in a series of books documenting the project’s evolution in cyberspace. Please continue to send your comments and feedback about the new site. Thank you for your commitment and continued readership.

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Suzy Perette – the perette silhouette – Lombardy Dresses Inc. – Garment District, NYC

GiGi Young Originals - © Frank H. Jump 1997

Incorporated on April 6, 1938 as Lombardy Dresses, the company became known as Perette Dresses on January 18, 1950, and as Suzy Perette from January 31, 1958 to April 14, 1960.

Originally posted on the Fading Ad Campaign website in 1999.

Forbes: Artist Power by Missy Sullivan -Best of The Web, 05.22.00

Photographer Frank Jump documents vintage ads on the sides of old New York buildings. He knows that little-known artists like himself need somewhere public to display their wares. They need dealers. Lotsa luck. While there’s no hard data, industry experts estimate that only about 5%-10% of artists nationally are represented by galleries. And those that are, regularly surrender 50%–or more–of the sales price.

Jump wasn’t exactly chased by dealers. So he took his stuff to the Internet. Log on to Frankjump.com, and you can see his work, e-mail him questions about it and buy it if it interests you.

“The site has acted as my press agent,” Jump says. It didn’t hurt that it was chosen as a Yahoo site of the week in early 1999. He’s now listed on nearly 80 search engines worldwide. – Missy Sullivan, Forbes Magazine

Brush Up Business with Paint, Paste, Paper & Push – Tribeca, NY

© Sandro & Gianna

© Gianna Narduzzo & Sandro Pavesio

Previously posted on Fading Ad Campaign website.

Taken in 1998 © Frank H. Jump

Taken in 1998 © Frank H. Jump

To the Editor: NY Times –

The sign uncovered at Reade Street and West Broadway in downtown New York City and described in Paul Goldberger’s May 14 appraisal of “Signs of Lost Times” may have “confounded city historians for years,” but it was clear to me the moment I saw it. “Brush Up Business With Paint, Paste, Paper, Push” is an advertisement for outdoor advertising itself — an ad for ads, if you will. In other (more modern) words: “Improve your business with outdoor billboards” (which are painted, pasted and papered). Why ‘Push’? For alliterative purposes only. “Push” means “sell.” Which is what outdoor advertising has been doing ever since, and very well at that. ROBERT REAUME President, Outdoor Advertising Association of Canada Toronto, May 19, 1994

Other references & links:

Frank H. Jump’s Fading Ads For Sale! @ Philip Hone Gallery – Honesdale, PA

Black & White Artist Prints

Black & White Artist Prints

Black & White Artist Prints

Black & White Artist Prints

Philip Hone Gallery Website

Fading Ad Blog Hits The Road Jack – Meet Us On The Way West!

Cross Country Itinerary by Trails dot com

Cross Country Itinerary by Trails dot com

We are planning to drive cross-country in our RV beginning tomorrow. Enzo and myself are planning to hit the northern route on the way across, going up to Vancouver – then down the west coast to Palm Springs – then crossing back doing the southern route through AZ, NM, TX, LA and up through TN.

Any fading ads you can suggest we see, please let us know – or meet us for coffee! Take it away Ray!

Fading Ad Blog featured on Brooklyn Review « Brooklyn Independent Television »

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Fading Ads Blog feature on Brooklyn R…“, posted with vodpod

Fading Ad Blog feature on Brooklyn Review « BRIC Community Media

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Fading Ads Blog feature on Brooklyn R…“, posted with vodpod

Fading Ad Blog Hits Half a Million! Thank You!

500,000 Hits © Frank H. Jump

500,000 Hits © Frank H. Jump

Fletcher’s Castoria – Double Feature – Weehawken, NJ

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

Other Fletcher’s postings

See the Fletcher’s Fading Ad Campaign webpage!

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Baby Ruth Candy Revisited – Butterfinger Candy – Delancey Street 1997

Fading Ad Campaign © Frank H. Jump

Taken March 1997 for theFading Ad Campaign © Frank H. Jump

I found scans of the original Ektachromes of several of my original Fading Ad Campaign images and have been updating the website. Here is one.  The sign under Baby Ruth is for another Curtiss Candy product – Butterfinger.

Saturation and Hue alterations © Frank H. Jump

Saturation and Hue alterations © Frank H. Jump

Baby Ruth was developed in 1921 and named after President Grover Cleveland’s daughter, who died at the age of twelve.

Curtis’s Candy of Chicago [1921-1964] sold Baby Ruth to Standard Brands when they dissolved, then bought by Nabisco, and in 1990, the candy bar was acquired by the Nestle Food Corp.

Ad circa 1930.

Originally posted at the Fading Ad Campaign website in 1999
Other Baby Ruth Candy postings

Crown Coat Front Co – Union Square – 1997 & 2008

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

From the roof of the NY Film Academy - April 1997 - © Frank H. Jump

From the roof of the NY Film Academy - April 1997 - © Frank H. Jump

Originally posted on the Fading Ad Campaign Website.

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

October 2008 - © Vincenzo Aiosa

Also visible are the Carl Fisher and Importers of Japanese Goods ads.

Hunter Baltimore Rye & The Mystery Man of 666 Broadway – Broadway Across from Lincoln Center – March, 2000 & April, 2002

Hunter Baltimore Rye - April 2002 - © Frank H. Jump

Hunter Baltimore Rye - April 2002 - © Frank H. Jump

Hunter Baltimore Rye - April 2002 - © Frank H. Jump

Hunter Baltimore Rye - April 2002 - © Frank H. Jump

Immediately when I saw this sign revealed, it solved a big mystery. I had shot a similar ad downtown between two buildings on Broadway and Bond (see map & image of man below).

David W. Dunlap (NYTimes) and I tried to decipher what product was being advertised for his December 10, 2000 NYTimes article: Olde York. Two years later, the mystery was solved when a building came down in the Lincoln Center area, east of Broadway.

666 Broadway & Bond - March 2000

666 Broadway & Bond - March 2000 - NY Times © Frank H. Jump

courtesy of David W. Dunlap, NY Times

courtesy of David W. Dunlap, NY Times

Originally posted on the Fading Ad Campaign Website

Reckitt’s Blue – Ten Years Ago Today – Revisiting The NY Times Metro Section – Front & Second Pages – July 9, 1998

NY Times Metro Section - July 9, 1998

Saving Images of Dead Signs on Walls - by Randy Kennedy - Public Lives - NY Times July 9, 1998

Another chapter in my very public life. Transparency, transparency – are we ever really naked? [Sung to tune of “O Tannenbaum”]

Bob Kisken & Frank H. Jump featured in Great Falls Tribune

Great Falls Tribune - Montana

Ghost signs offer a peek into the past

By RICHARD ECKE • Tribune Staff Writer • July 6, 2008