Daily Archives: May 24, 2009

In Civil War, Woman Fought Like A Man For Freedom by Linda Paul – NPR Weekend Edition

Disguised as a man, Jennie Hodgers marched thousands of miles as a soldier during the Civil War - NPR Weekend Edition

Disguised as a man, Jennie Hodgers marched thousands of miles as a soldier during the Civil War - NPR Weekend Edition

NPR Weekend Edition

NPR Weekend Edition

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From WE SHALL OVERCOME To YES WE CAN!: Our First African-American President – A Blog-Quest Curriculum for Fifth Grade – Robert Ross, Teaching Artist & Frank H. Jump, Cert. Instructional Technology Specialist

(Left) Scene in Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. Note building with sign reading Auction & Negro Sales, a slave trade business. Slave auction ad (middle) On right: Scars of a whipped slave (April 2, 1863, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. Original caption: Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture. - Wikipedia

(Left) Scene in Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. Note building with sign reading "Auction & Negro Sales", a slave trade business. Slave auction ad (middle) On right: Scars of a whipped slave (April 2, 1863, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. Original caption: Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture. - Wikipedia

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

I. Slavery in the New World: Which Side Are You On?
II. Abolitionists & The Underground Railroad
III. The Civil War: A Moral Dilemma Tears Apart The Nation
IV. Reconstruction: From Bondage to the Ballot Box to Public Office
V. The Jim Crow Era
VI. We Shall Overcome: Brown v. The Board of Education
VII. I Have A Dream: The Civil Rights Struggle of the 1950s & 1960s
VIII. African Americans in High Places in the USA
IX. Yes We Can: Barack Obama Becomes Our First African-American President
X. Recording Session

CLICK HERE FOR FULL PROJECT NARRATIVE

Project created and written by Robert “Bluesman” Ross
This project is made possible with funds from the Local Capacity Building Initiative, a regrant program of the Arts in Education Program of the New York State Council on the Arts, administered by BRIC Arts / Media / Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

Project designed for blog by lead teacher, Frank H. Jump.

Robert Ross has worked with our school through BRIC’s Rotunda Gallery. This grant was written by Ross for our school, PS 119, where I teach technology. I took Ross’s curriculum, in which the task for students is to write four lines of rhyme or rap for each section, and created a blog-quest with links to the songs and lyrics, in addition to providing powerful images culled from the Internet with additional links and resources. Feel free to use this in your classrooms. Please leave comments.