The Weekend’s Featured Fade: A Retrospective by Robert Baptista in N’Orleans, 1996

Shutters
Shutters Flapping, PreKatrinaFrench Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Bourbon Street
Bourbon Street at Night- French Quarter, New Orleans 1996

Domino Sugar
Domino Sugar Factory – View from Mississippi River, New Orleans, 1996

Preservation Hall
Preservation Hall– French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Antoine's
Antoine’s Restaurant– French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Broussard's
Broussard’s Restaurant– French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Burlesque
Bourbon Street Burlesque Club– New Orleans, 1996

Gumbo
Gumbo Heads Cajun T-Shirt Honky-Tonk– French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

K Paul's
K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen– French Quarter, 1996

Le Petit's
Le Petit Theater– French Quarter, New Orleans 1996

Mardi Gras Poster
Mardi Gras Poster- French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Maxwell's
Maxwell’s Toulouse-Cabaret- 615 Toulouse Street
French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996
Due to the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina,
the following description may no longer be accurate.

Nawlins
N’awlins Cajun & Creole Spices French Market
1101 North Peter Street – French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Pat O'Brien's
Pat O’Brien’s Mint Juleps- French Quarter, New Orleans, 1996

Pearl
The Pearl Oyster Bar
119 Saint Charles Ave – French Quarter, New Orleans 1996

Rawlinson
Rawlinson Studio Art Gallery– French Quarter, 1996

All photos © Robert Baptista

More pages:

GUMBO PAGES, NOLA.com, Katrina Aid Today

2 responses to “The Weekend’s Featured Fade: A Retrospective by Robert Baptista in N’Orleans, 1996

  1. The photos evoke pre-Katrina New Orleans with a vibrant French Quarter, great restaurants and lively music venues. The 2005 hurricane spared the French Quarter of the flooding that destroyed residential neighborhoods, some perhaps permanently. But many restaurants were closed for a year or more due to repairs and the absence of tourists.

    The city is slowly coming back. Preservation Hall, famous for jazz, has reopened. Willie Mae’s Scotch House, a revered corner café in the Treme neighborhood, owned by 91-year-old Mrs. Willie Mae Seaton, has been rebuilt by volunteers at a cost of $200,000. It’s best known for the fried chicken.

    The huge Domino Sugar plant on the banks of the Mississippi was flooded in 2006 but is back in operation. The Domino Sugar refinery on the East River in Brooklyn, a landmark dating back to the 1880s, closed in 2004.

  2. marlinjsanders

    This is making me hungry and homesick! Other than that, I enjoy seeing familar places while working away. Great Blog.